MOOR CRAG

1898

Gillhead, near Cartmel Fell,
Lake Windermere, Cumbria, Lancashire.

For J. W. Buckley.

1900 stables.

The house has been divided into two.

 

 

Studio, vol. 31, 1904, p.128
RIBA Photographs Collection

 

 

Photo on paradisebackyard.blogspot.de

 

 

Moor Crag, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo by sfPhotocraft (James) on flickr

 

 

 

Photo by Chris Rycroft on twitter

 

 

Photo by sfPhotocraft on flickr (James)

 

 

Photo by sfPhotocraft on flickr (James)

 

 

 

Photo by Chris Rycroft on twitter

 

 

Moor Crag, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo by Voysey Society on picuki.com (Instagram)

 

Moor Crag, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

Moor Crag, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo by Pricegore on twitter

 

 

Contemporary photograph,
published in David Gebhard, fig. 76, p.137
RIBA Photographs Collection

 

 

Photo on www.artsandcraftsdesign.com

 

Moor Crag, Paul Klopfer, Voyseys Architektur-Idyllen, Moderne Bauformen, 1910

 

 

Moor Crag, Gillhead, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

 

Moor Crag, Gillhead, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo by Chris Rycroft on twitter

 

 

 Photo on arch.mcgill.ca

 

 

Chimney in the drawing-room,
Photo published in Duncan Simpson,
C.F.A. VOYSEY an architect of individuality
, pl. 30f, p.76
RIBA Photographs Collection

 

 

Moor Crag, Gillhead, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

Moor Crag, Gillhead, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

Moor Crag, first scheme, 1898

 

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection

 

 

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection

 

______________________________

 

Image below from the Victoria and Albert Museum,
published in John Brandon-Jones and others, C.F.A. Voysey: architect and designer 1857-1941,
Lund Humphries, London 1978, fig. 21, p. 16.
 
Click on image for a larger version.
 

Link > Victoria and Albert Museum

 

 

The entry in Pevsner's Cumbria (with Matthew Hyde, 2010) reads:

MOOR CRAG, a little s of Broadleys, and on the other side of the road. By CFA Voysey, 1899-1900, for JW Buckley of Altrincham near Manchester, where he had a house called Westwood.

The quintessence of the Lake District, despite the fact that Voysey had one style wherever he built, and of the vernacular, even though it copies no local precedent. Muthesius's admiration was echoed by Pevsner in 1969, who said of Moor Crag and Broadleys that 'there is nothing of the date on the Continent to come up to their standard. The future and the past blend effortlessly indeed. They are C20 pioneer work and yet free Tudor'. Yet the sweet simplicity of the house, and its absolute rightness in the landscape, were not arrived at without effort. Moor Crag was on the drawing board in 1898 but it was more than a year before the design was finalised, and the catslide roof sweeping down at the lake end was the result of changing its position (like Blackwell it is end-on to the lake with long N & S sides). The great swept roof is the thing, punctuated by dormers and gables on both main sides, without formal correspondences, and set off by the massive verticals of the chimneys, and the long horizontals of the eaves and dripmoulds. There is no service wing to disturb the perfect 'house that Jack built'; services were accommodated in an existing building down the garden path. The window dressings and mullions, absolutely flush and unmoulded, the steps and the floors of Buttermere slate, of a most beautiful blue; a different palette to Broadleys and Blackwell. The three upper cross-windows on the entrance side represent the staircase landings. (Staircase again with close vertical slats). Voysey took double care to ventilate the house when empty, with tiny opening lights in each window, and an extra chimney flue connecting to all the little air vents: typical of the extreme thought lavished on what was, after all, only a holiday home.

Thomas Mawson did the site survey and blasted out the romantic drive.

Source: Pevsner Architectural Guides at Yale University Press.

Link > www.voyseysociety.org

 

Description on Historic England

CARTMEL FELL NEWBY BRIDGE ROAD SD 39 SE (East side) 3/26 Moor Crag 25.3.70 I
House, now with flat to west end. 1898-1900. By C.F.A. Voysey. Roughcast with slate dressings and hipped slate roof. North facade of 2 storeys and 7 irregular bays, the end bay is of one storey. 1st and 6th bays under gables, that to 6th bay is swept down over 7th bay, emphasising the slope of the ground. Dripcourse over ground floor windows of 6th and 7th bay and over 1st floor windows of 1st and 6th bays; gables have 3 slots under dripstone. Wide eaves and moulded bargeboards. Raking buttress to left of 6th bay. Windows have flat slate dressings and mullions; leaded glazing with rectangular quarries; 1st bay of ground floor has canted bay window of 2+2+2 lights with cornice and flat lead-clad roof extended over verandah to right, which has timber posts on slate-coped walls and 4 steps. Single light and 2-light window flank entrance, with half-glazed door; single light to right of verandah. 6th bay has 3+3-light window; single light to 7th bay. 1st floor has 4-light window to 1st bay; 2-light window with single lights to left and right; 3 cross-mullion windows, 2 are paired; full light to right of buttress has transom; 6th bay has single light and 3-light window. Lead downpipes have scrolled clasping supports. Bootscraper by steps has tall handle. South facade of 5 bays, the 1st 2 bays gabled with roof swept down to left, the 5th bay gabled, the 3rd bay a 2-storey canted bay window with top cornice and later slate-hung apron. Roof of 4th bay swept down over verandah with trellis supports and extends to right over canted bay window. Dripcourses over windows to 1st, 2nd and 5th bays. 1st 2 bays have 3-light windows; canted bays have 2+2+2-light windows, that to 3rd bay with half-glazed door to right return; 4th bay has 4-light window with round window to left, and 3-light flat-topped roof dormer with cornice; 5th bay has 4-light window to 1st floor. Entrance to left hand end. Large stack to roof slope has typical Voysey tall pots. Gutter downpipe to left of 3rd bay. West facade dominated by roof slope; 2 single lights flank round arch with recessed door with strap hinges, similar door to entrance to right; triangular dormer over arch and 3-light dormer higher up to left, large stack with tall pots at top of slope. East facade has projecting lateral stack with tall pots in gabled projection, flanking 2-light windows. Interior not inspected but said to have original fittings: panelling, stair, fireplaces, etc. Moor Crag is one of Voysey's finest houses and one of the most important of its date in Europe.

 

Photographs and Drawings Courtesy of The Royal Institute of British Architects.
Photographs, drawings, perspectives and other design patterns
at the Royal Institut of British Architects Drawings and Photographs Collection.
Images can be purchased.
The RIBA can supply you with conventional photographic or digital copies
of any of the images featured in RIBApix.


Link > RIBA Drawings Collection: Moor Crag Images

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection: all Voysey Images

 

Link > Black & White Photos on flickr taken in 1976

Link > www.artsandcraftsdesign.com (Photos)

 

References:

The Builder's Journal & Architectural Record, XVI, 1903-04, pp.176-177&182.

 Architectural Review (Boston), XI, 1904, p. 12, XIV, 1907, p. 248 (photographs of exterior).

 The Studio, XXXI, 1904, p. 128 (photograph of exterior).

 The Studio Yearbook, 1907, p. 41.

 The Architect, LXXVIII, 1907, p. 296 (photographs of exterior).

 David Gebhard, Charles F. A. Voysey, 1975, fig. 76.

 Wendy Hitchmough, CFA  VOYSEY, Phaidon Press, London 1995, pp.114-123. 

 

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