LODGE STYLE.

Shaft Road,
Combe Down, near Bath,
Avon.

1909

For T. Sturge Cotterell.



The client was a quarry-owner, therefore the house was made of stone.

J. Brandon-Jones: "Cotterell had wanted something reminding him of Merton College, Oxford,
                               so Voysey designed him a miniature college quadrangle."

Joanna Symonds: "The house is built round a courtyard like a miniature monastic or college building.
                              The walls are of stone from Bath Stone Firms Ltd (Cotterell's business) and the roofs are of slate.
                              The windows have stone mullions and iron casements.
                              The interiors have unplastered walls and white, coved plaster ceilings.
                              There is a photograph of an interior at the RIBA."

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo Duncan Simpson

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Photo by Christopher Vickers

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

Lodge Style, Coombe Down, photo courtesy of John Trotter

 

 

 
Photo published in Stuart Durant, CFA VOYSEY, Architectural Monographs No 19, p.97.
RIBA Photographs Collection

 

 

Lodge Style; the first scheme.
Not executed in this form.
Published in: Peter Davey, Arts and Crafts Architecture, p.88
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Section
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

As Duncan Simpson mentioned, the first scheme of a Collegiate Bungalow style,
to be built around a courtyard or, more properly in this case, quadrangle, forty feet by thirty feet,
was whittled down so that as built the quadrangle has become a cramped 23 feet by 21 feet (approximately).
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Lodge Style, image on picuki.com,
RIBA Drawings Collection

 

 

First scheme, not executed in this form.
Elevations and Ground plan published in
The British Architect, 13th August 1909.
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

First scheme, not executed in this form.
Ground plan published in
The British Architect, 13th August 1909.
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Text published in The British Architect, 13th August 1909, p.111.

 

 

East elevation and West elevation (RIBA Drawings Collection).

 

South elevation (RIBA Drawings Collection)

 

____________________________________

 

 

Ground plan for the third scheme, showing the house as executed.
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Lodge Style, third scheme, showing the house as executed.
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Lodge Style, third scheme, showing the house as executed.
RIBA Drawings Collection.

 

 

Lodge Style, published in The Studio Yearbook 1910.

 

 

Lodge Style, published in The Studio Yearbook 1910.

 

Descripton on Historic England

SHAFT ROAD, Combe Down 656-1/68/2003 (East side) Lodge Style 11/08/72 II*
Detached house. 1909, by Charles F. A. Voysey. MATERIALS: Limestone ashlar, stone Cotswold slate roof. PLAN: Courtyard house, with entrance porch tower to north-west corner, garage wing projects at north side. EXTERIOR: Single storey, leaded casement windows with moulded stone mullions and four-centred heads, entrance front has broad plain tower with wide gabled stone porch over pointed arch with triple wave mould, to high plain splayed plinth, and studded plank door with decorative strap hinges. To left are three and two-light windows, under moulded drip course stopped to carved angel, to right, carrying shield with date 1909. Further left lower unit with crenellated parapet, and return wall, also crenellated to plank door in four-centred head, and garage door. Remainder of building has steep roof on sprocketted eaves. Return right has porch tower with clasping buttress to right, and projecting porch buttress to left, single light at first floor and three-light below, both with stopped drips. Main range has oriel with one:two:twelve-lights to stone roof and moulded eaves and deep stone bracket, single and four-light. Outer gabled end raking buttress, flush with return face and taken up to eaves height: typical Voysey touch. South front has ventilation slit in gable over oriel with one:two:one-lights. To right wide arched opening to deep open lobby on three + three steps, with plank doors in rear wall to corridor. To right three and four-light windows and low arched door, returned to hipped end. East front more restrained, with four windows, to plain square heads, and to hipped return. Four large square stacks, each with plain cornice and high upper stage with flat cap on vertical slits. INTERIOR: Not inspected. Central courtyard with stone table in centre; dining and drawing rooms with segmental vaulted ceilings and large open hearths to west, bedrooms to east and south, services along north range. HISTORY: Designed for T. Sturge Cotterell, Bath Alderman and owner of the Combe Down quarries; just as Ralph Allen's Prior Park presented the quarry-owner with the chance to display the quality of his goods, so Lodge Style was a flamboyant display of masonry. Its exposed position on a ridge led to the compact, low design which emphasised warmth and enclosure, and in which interior, exterior and setting are all cleverly integrated. Hitchmough described the result as important as a testament to Voysey's personal interpretation of Gothic principles. A notable private house of its day, fusing Voysey's characteristically distinctive touch with a host of historicist and vernacular references (inspired by the owner's Oxford college, Merton), and showing the continuing possibilities of Bath stone as a building material. It is also a very unusual building for the Bath locality, and one of the very few fairly recent houses in the area by an architect of international standing. Voysey's drawings are in the British Architectural Library (repro. In Jackson, p.235).
SOURCES: 'Country Life', 8 April 1911, 9-11; Julian Orbach, 'Blue Guide to Victorian Architecture in Britain' (1987), 27; Neil Jackson, 'Nineteenth Century Bath. Architects and Architecture' (1991), 233-237; Wendy Hitchmough, 'CFA Voysey' (n.d.), 204-5, 214-5.

 

Photographs and Drawings Courtesy of The Royal Institute of British Architects.
Photographs, drawings, perspectives and other design patterns
at the Royal Institut of British Architects Drawings and Photographs Collection.
Images can be purchased.
The RIBA can supply you with conventional photographic or digital copies
of any of the images featured in RIBApix.

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection: Lodge Style

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection: all Voysey Images

 

Link > www.artsandcraftsdesign.com (Photo and perspectives)

Link > www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk

Link > 3D Model by Michael Alan

 

References:

- Peter Davey, Arts and Crafts Architecture: The Search for Earthly Paradise, 224 pages,
                        Publisher: Architectural Press, London 1980,
  > Chapter 8  The Pathfinder, pp. 82-96. (Chapter about Voysey) PDF

 

The British Architect, LXXII, 1909, pp. 111 & 114; LXXVII, 1911, p. 361.

The Builder, XCVIII, 1910, p. 264.

The Studio Yearbook, 1910, p. 82.

The Architect, CI, 1919, p. 54; CXVI, 1927, p. 219.

Duncan Simpson, C.F.A. VOYSEY an architect of individuality, London 1979.

 Wendy Hitchmough, CFA  VOYSEY, London 1995, pp. 204-5, 214-5.

 David Cole, The Art and architecture of CFA Voysey : English pioneer modernist architect & designer, 2015.

 

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